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Mango Mascarpone Roll Cake

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This mango mascarpone roll cake is my go to cake for the holidays, but it is so delicious that I sometimes make it during the year! It is moist, refreshingly fruity and creamy, and a perfect light dessert to finish off a heavy meal. The fluffy whipping cream all around the outside adds the right amount of lightness to the silky mascarpone filling. Combined with the satisfying snap of the white chocolate flavoured candy melts; this cake is truly delicious!

Every year for Christmas or New Years, my family demands I make mango mascarpone roll cake. One year I decided that maybe I’ll try and make a different cake instead. You know, for some variety and to keep things fresh. They all took it very personally and told me that next year I better make the cake or they won’t be coming over. They really enjoyed the alternative cake too, but it just wasn’t the same. So there I was, the next year baking this same mango mascarpone roll.

Sadly, because of lockdown we can’t get together for the holidays. But I still made this cake because tradition called for it.

I first saw this mango ricotta roll recipe in the “All You Need is Cheese” magazine by Dairy Farmers of Canada years ago. The recipe called for ricotta instead of mascarpone. Coincidentally, I had an extra unopened container of mascarpone left over from making tiramisu, which I also bake every Christmas. So I subbed in mascarpone instead and the recipe kept changing and evolving each year until it finally became this recipe that my family enjoys each year!

The Sponge Made Easy

Usually making a sponge involves beating the egg yolks and the egg whites with sugar separately from each other. Then you add flour to the egg yolks and very gently fold in the egg whites into the egg yolks in three additions. This involved 2 mixing bowls and a very lumpy deflated batter because the flour and egg yolks would never mix into the the whites gently enough since the mixture was so dense. Even when I would divide the white by thirds, adding a third at a time to the egg yolk mixture.

So I thought back to my Sharlotka Apple Cake family recipe. It is also a sponge cake, but the eggs are beaten with sugar without dividing them. No extra bowls involved! It always turns out so light and fluffy too, never lumpy. I took that concept and applied it to the sponge here to get the fluffiest and easiest sponge you will ever make! Especially if you have a stand mixer, which will make your life so much easier.

The addition of baking powder may seem a bit unorthodox, but it helps to reassure me that the sponge will stay nice and fluffy after it comes out of the oven. In my experience, a typical sponge will deflate slightly after baking, but this one stands tall and strong!

To make the roll without breaking the sponge, it has to be rolled as soon as it comes out of the oven. I like to give the sponge a minute to cool down before rolling so that I don’t burn my hands. I find that it doesn’t affect the end result. Do not wait too long after you pull the sponge from the oven, or it won’t roll up easily and you could end up with cracks.

Filling the Mango Mascarpone Roll

To make the roll extra moist, brush the sponge with a simple syrup before filling it with the mango mascarpone filling. You want to work fairly quickly because the roll has set in a roll shape and the longer it is unrolled, the higher the chances of it breaking and cracking due to gravity pulling it apart. Don’t be afraid of a crack here or there when you unroll the sponge, they won’t be noticeable once the sponge is filled and rolled back up.

Making the Mango Mascarpone Roll

Making the Sponge

Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). Line a 12″ by 18″ cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Crack the eggs into a clean bowl of a stand mixer. Add the salt and mix on high speed with the whisk attachment. After about 30 seconds, slowly pour in the granulated sugar into the stand mixer while running. The eggs will increase in volume considerably and get very foamy. This may take anywhere from 6-8 minutes. You will know it is ready when you can draw a figure eight from the ribbon falling off the whisk onto the rest of the batter. The figure eight should sit on top of the batter for about 10 seconds before dissolving back into the batter. If it dissolves faster than 10 seconds, then beat the eggs a little more. If using an electric handheld mixer, this process may take about 5 minutes longer.

Sift the flour and baking powder into the bowl with the beaten eggs. Using a spatula, carefully fold the flour into the egg mixture. Be gentle so as not to deflate the eggs. Stop folding as soon as you stop seeing streaks of flour in the batter. This could take longer than you think, so just keep folding gently.

Smooth the batter evenly onto the lined baking sheet. Bake in the middle of the preheated oven for 18-20 minutes, checking for doneness at 18 minutes. It is ready once a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean and the surface springs back a little when you press onto it.

Remove the sponge from the oven and let cool for one minute. Flip it over onto a cooling rack to remove the parchment paper on the back. Peel off the parchment paper and flip back over so the top surface of the cake is on top again.

Immediately start rolling the sponge by rolling the short end of the roll onto itself. Let the roll cool on the cooling rack. You want to roll it as soon as possible so that it doesn’t crack.

Making the Filling

In a medium saucepan, combine the mango, sugar and water. Slowly bring to a simmer, stirring frequently so that the bottom does not burn. Simmer on medium-low heat for 10 minutes, until the mango is very soft and it thickens up.

Let the mango cool and blend in a blender or a food processor until smooth.

Stir together the mango mixture and mascarpone until smooth. Set it aside in the fridge until assembly.

Making the Simple Syrup

Optionally, for an extra moist cake you can soak the sponge with a simple syrup. Combine equal parts of water and granulated sugar into a small saucepan. Bring to a boil and stir until all the sugar is dissolved. Let cool.

Making the Decorations

If I am not making this roll during the holidays, I usually like to decorate the surface with a sprinkling of toasted coconut. It makes the cake taste like a fruity Raffaello candy. To toast the coconut, spread 1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut onto a baking sheet and place in an oven heated to 190°C. Toast for about 5 to 6 minutes, giving it a stir at 4 minutes. Make sure to keep a close eye on the coconut so it doesn’t burn. Immediately transfer to another plate to cool to stop it toasting from residual heat. Sprinkle over the whipping cream when assembling the cake.

During the holidays, I like to cover the roll with candy melts, melted to resemble bark. That way it becomes a mango mascarpone log cake.

Line a 12″ by 18″ cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Bring a medium saucepan full of water to a simmer. In a heatproof bowl placed over the simmering water, melt the candy melts, stirring constantly. Spread the melted candy melts in a thin layer onto the parchment paper. Let cool in fridge until solid. This will happen pretty quickly.

Break the candy melts into large shards, using a knife dipped into hot water to score the surface so that it helps guide the breaking.

Assembling the Mango Mascarpone Roll

Beat the cream and sugar together with an electric whisk or in a stand mixer with a whisk attachment until it forms stiff peaks, being very careful not to over whip.

Carefully unroll the spongecake.

Optionally, for a more moist cake, brush some of the simple syrup evenly over the sponge. Be careful not to use too much or you may end up with a soggy cake. I use about 5-6 tablespoons. Soak the cake to your preference.

Working quickly, spread the mango mascarpone filling evenly on the inside. Roll the sponge back up immediately.

Spread the whipping cream over the top of the roll. Using a large serrated bread knife, slice about an inch off of both ends of the log to clean up the edges and get a clear view of the swirl. Use a sawing motion so that the roll does not get squished.

Arrange the candy melt shards lengthwise on top of the whipping cream to cover the whole surface. Use both the small and large shards to make the roll resemble a log covered in bark. Refrigerate until serving. The cake will keep well for a few days in a fridge.

Right before serving, dust the surface of the log with powdered sugar in a fine sieve to resemble snow. Enjoy!

Mango Mascarpone Roll (Log) Cake

What better way to finish off your dinner with this delicious light and refreshing mango roll? With a super creamy and delightfully fruity filling and fluffy whipping cream all around, you won't be able to resist this one. The best part about it is that the sponge is an all-in-one method, meaning you don't have to separate the yolks and the whites and beat them separately before carefully folding them together. And in my opinion, it tastes even better! Because when you're already baking, why do you need that extra fuss?
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Assembly 10 mins
Total Time 1 hr
Course Dessert
Cuisine American, French
Servings 8 people

Ingredients
  

Sponge

  • 6 large eggs room temperature
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 cup sugar granulated
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup flour all-purpose
  • ½ tsp baking powder

Filling

  • 3 cups mango, cubed fresh or frozen
  • ½ cup sugar granulated
  • cup water
  • 1 cup mascarpone cheese room temperature

Simple Syrup Soak (optional for a more moist cake)

  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup water

Bark

  • 1 cup white candy melts see notes for alternative decorations

Assembly

  • 1 cup whipping cream
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • ¼ cup powdered sugar

Instructions
 

Sponge

  • Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). Line a 12" by 18" cookie sheet with parchment paper.
  • Beat the eggs: Crack the eggs into a clean bowl of a stand mixer. Add the salt and mix on high speed with the whisk attachment. After about 30 seconds, gradually pour the sugar into the stand mixer while it is running. The eggs will increase in volume considerably and get very foamy. This may take 6-8 minutes. You will know it is ready when you lift the whisk out of the egg mixture and can make a figure eight from the ribbon falling off the whisk onto the rest of the batter. The figure eight should sit on top of the batter for about 10 seconds before melting back into the batter. If it dissolves faster than 10 seconds, beat the eggs some more.
    If using an electric handheld mixer, this process may take about 5 minutes longer.
  • Fold in the flour: Sift the flour and baking powder into the bowl with the beaten eggs. Using a spatula, carefully fold the flour into the egg mixture. Be gentle so as not to deflate the eggs. Stop folding as soon as you stop seeing streaks of flour in the batter.
  • Bake: Smooth the batter onto the lined baking sheet. Bake in middle of oven for 18-20 minutes, checking for doneness at 18 minutes. It is ready once a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean and it springs back a little when you press onto the surface of the sponge.
  • Remove from oven and let cool for 1 minute. Flip over onto a cooling rack to remove the parchment paper on the back. Peel off the parchment paper and flip back over so the top surface of the cake is on top again.
  • Roll: Immediately start rolling the sponge by rolling the short end of the roll onto itself. Let the roll cool on the cooling rack. You want to roll the sponge as soon as possible so that it doesn't crack.

Filling

  • Cook the mango: In a medium saucepan, combine the mango, sugar and water. Simmer on medium-low heat for 10 minutes, until the mango is very soft and it thickens up.
  • Cool and blend: Let the mango cool and blend in a blender or a food processor until smooth.
  • Stir together the mango mixture and mascarpone until smooth. Set it aside in the fridge until assembly.

Simple Syrup Soak

  • Optionally, for an extra moist cake you can soak the sponge with a simple syrup. Combine equal parts of water and granulated sugar into a small saucepan. Bring to a boil and stir until all the sugar is dissolved. Let cool.

Candy Melt Bark

  • See notes for an alternative to decorating with candy melt bark.
  • Line a 12" by 18" cookie sheet with parchment paper.
  • Melt the candymelts: Bring a medium saucepan full of water to a simmer. In a heatproof bowl placed over the simmering water, melt the candy melts, stirring constantly. Spread the melted candy melts in a thin layer onto the parchment paper. Let cool in fridge until solid. This will happen pretty quickly.
  • Break the candy melts into long shards, using a heated knife (dipped into hot water and dried, or heated with a kitchen torch) to score the surface so that it helps guide the breaking.

Assembly

  • Beat the cream and sugar together with an electric whisk or in a stand mixer with a whisk attachment until it forms stiff peaks, being very careful not to over whip.
  • Brush with simple syrup: Carefully unroll the spongecake. At this point, for a more moist cake, you can soak the sponge with a simple syrup. Brush about 5-6 tbsp (or as you prefer) of the simple syrup evenly over the sponge. Be careful not to use too much syrup or it will be too wet.
  • Spread the filling: Working quickly, spread the mango mascarpone filling evenly on the inside. Roll the sponge back up immediately.
  • Spread the whipping cream over the top of the roll. Using a large serrated bread knife, slice about an inch off of both ends of the log to clean up the edges and get a clear view of the swirl. Use a sawing motion to get a clean cut without squishing the roll.
  • Make the bark: Arrange the candy melt shards lengthwise on top of the whipping cream to cover the whole surface. Use both the small and large shards to make the roll resemble a log covered in bark. Refrigerate until serving. The cake will keep well for a few days in a fridge.
  • Just before serving, dust the surface of the log with powdered sugar in a fine seive to resemble snow.

Notes

  • Alternative decorations (no candy melts): Toast 1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut in an oven heated to 190°C (375°F). Toast for about 5 to 6 minutes, keeping a close eye on them so they do not burn. Immediately transfer to another plate to cool so they stop toasting from residual heat. Sprinkle over whipping cream when assembling the cake.
  • I use candy melts to decorate instead of white chocolate because I do not have to temper them and they taste very close to the real deal. Tempering is a whole other long process that I usually don’t have time for when making the cake. If you prefer not to use candy melts then feel free to decorate with toasted coconut or however you prefer (see first note)!
  • Simple syrup soak: For an extra moist cake you can soak the sponge with a simple syrup. You may have some syrup left over. Soak the cake to your preference. Be careful not to over soak or you may be left with a soggy cake.
  • When making the sponge, make sure to beat the eggs well. This is important because this step is what will make your sponge super light and fluffy.
  • Stop folding the flour into the beaten eggs as soon as you stop seeing any streaks of flour. This way you don’t get too much gluten formation that will make your cake dense. This step may take much longer than you think. Just keep folding gently and carefully.
Keyword buche de noel, Cake, mango, roll cake, Sponge, Whipping Cream

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